Children’s Easter Egg HUNT with 6 printable clues

It’s getting close to that time of year again…EASTER! Now it is important to remember what the weekend is all about, the resurrection of Jesus Christ. But it is also about chocolate. Chocolate in the shape of a pre-baby-chicks ie. eggs! I’m not even a huge chocolate egg fan, but at easter some weird creature takes over me and I am powerless to its’ every whim.

A great way to feel better about plonking down on the sofa and eating your weight in fairly average chocolate is to have to hunt for it first. When we were little’uns our parents used to hide loads of eggs all over the house some little cream eggs others the proper boxes. There were no clues and it was great, running around like headless chickens (I think there is a pun or something funny in there somewhere) throwing them all into a pile. Very democratically our parents used to split them all up fairly between us kids to be devoured. There were always a couple we’d find in Autumn that we missed too! In the later years (I mean my 20s) I persuaded them to make a clued hunt – and I think I liked it MORE!

A clue to lead them to the fridge

A clue to lead them to the fridge

In this post I have also tried my very first FREE PRINTABLE! So super excited I feel like a girl being asked to the prom…an American girl being asked to the American prom! In a group effort between my mother and I we have come up with 6 clues for children to do a little hunt and they are all in your average homey places. So pretty please print the PDF below and have some fun (let me know of those inevitable issues too please). UPDATE ME LATER MY ANNIHILATORS OF CHOCOLATE! Easter Clues PDF

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A clue for them to sneak a peak under the pillow on their bed!

 

DIY leatherette iPad/tablet case

iPad case DIY

Hello lovely readers… I hope you’re still with me as the blog is not such a newby anymore! And I’m still here so I hope that you are too! You should by now know that I am a big fan of handmade gifts, especially homemade ones too! What do you get the man that doesn’t really need anything? Well you think outside the box. What does he (or she) have that you can build upon. Well mine, he has an iPad semi permanently on his person..but…no case! TaDa!

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Leatherette is a great vegan alternative to leather, it has a awesome look and feel and there are so many types that you definitely are not limited by picking this option. I’m not even vegan and I still pick to use it so maybe that’ll persuade you to give it a try before you write it off completely.

The first and most important step is to decide your fundamental design and cut the fabric accurately. I did a lot of research on Pinterest looking both at tutorials and cases for sale to get some inspiration before sketching out my favourite features. I like the idea of the bottom being a fold and not a seam, raw edging showing and a statement fastening so that formed the basis of my design. I find it best to find a few statements and then allow one’s imagination to fill in the blanks otherwise you can find you move around in circles.

Lay out the leatherette, place the iPad down with a 1.5cm allowance on three sides then flip it once (this is important as to take into account the width of the tablet itself!). If you are basing your design on an envelope style like me, flip the case again add 1.5cm allowance to the top and cut your fabric out. Now here is your basic to work with. Next shape you envelope/flap by trimming the scissors (remember to add that width thickness all the sides otherwise your envelope might not be big enough! If you want to add something extra try sewing the persons name onto the front, my machine does letters – still a bit of skill is needed so make sure you practise!

Case lined with black linen

I lined the inside of mine with black linen, using a spray adhesive. I then sew the top flat line to keep the fabric in place as well as wanting my stitching to show (a tight zigzag stitch). Sew up the sides, as I already said I put the inside side together as leatherette doesn’t fray and I love the look of exposed stitching! Pop on a statement button (this one really reminds me of a wax envelope seal!) and cut a slit in your envelope for it to go through. If I was clever enough I would have done a button hole stitch..but not too worried – remember that amazing no fray-ness 😀

I really love how it turned learnt a few things for next time. It does have a homemade feel about it but that’s half the charm! I didn’t get any complaints from the man either! I hope this encourages you to give something a try and make your own design/pattern. Happy experimenting!

Milk and Ginger African Tea

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No need to peel the ginger

This is a great recipe for a creamy sweet tea with a little kick. I love it all the time, come rain or shine. It is good for a winter comfort drink as well as having health benefits if you’re feeling under weather with a cold.

My first taste of this creamy and delightful African tea was in Rwanda in January 2014. We (a team of 20 strong young Brits) had just landed in Kigali the day before and mustered the courage and strength to go into town. We found a rather Western looking coffee shop and sought refuge and a friend brought a cup of tea. Her face when she took the first sip was priceless – no home comfort was found in it as she tasted a steamed milk and ginger concoction! She wasn’t a fan, but me, I was hooked from that first stolen cup!P1010722

From Kigali 8 of us drifted down to Rwamagana to work with the African Evangelical Enterprise and The Centre for Champions. The co-ordinator of the Centre for Champions, passed me her recipe and with a little twisting so that it works with things we have here in the UK I formed this fantastic recipe. If you want it to be more like the real deal you need to swap out the water for whole milk. Because the milk is processed differently in Africa you still don’t get quite the same taste!

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P1010731If you really don’t have a sweet tooth you can cut down the sugar but be warned, as the sugar decreases the kick from the ginger gets less noticeable and I’m a ginger addict so that didn’t work so well for me. The best way to find your perfect fit is to make a couple with different sugar levels and then settle on your favourite. I halve the sugar for my mum and then add another spoon after I have poured her mug out of the batch.

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Recipe for African Tea (makes 2 mugs)

Ingredients:                                             The making implements:
1 tbsp. freshly grated ginger                 Small Saucepan
4 tsp granulated sugar                           Spoon for stirring
1 mug of milk                                          Mugs
1 mug of boiling water
2 tea bags

One. In your saucepan put the ginger and teabag and cover with boiling water. Allow this this to simmer on a low heat for 5 minutes (mmmm flavour time).
Two. Remove the teabag. Add the milk and sugar. Stir occasionally and turn the heat up a little but not the boil.
Three. After a minute using a sieve/strainer pour the tea from the pan straight into your mug or teapot and drink.

P.S. you can also enjoy this African tea iced. Add the sugar and when dissolved add the milk then strain and pop in the fridge. When ready to drink drop in an ice cube or two and enjoy.P1010749